Posts Tagged ‘American Health Care Act’

Trumpster-RyanCare Flatlines

March 24, 2017

Peter Suderman explains the Republicans’ failure to pass the American Health Care Act:

“[Trump] is more interested in a win, or avoiding a loss, than any of the arcane policy specifics of the complicated measure, according to a dozen aides and allies interviewed over the past week who described his mood as impatient and jittery,” The New York Times reported today.

Trump spent the last two weeks selling the House plan. He met with specific individuals and with various congressional factions opposed to the bill. He personally called the offices of more than 100 legislators. He has cajoled and threatened, telling those who refused to back the legislation that they would lose their seats. He threw the entire weight of his personality and the office of the president behind the vote, saying that he backed the bill “one-thousand percent.”

But he never took the time to explain to either the public or congressional Republicans what the bill actually did. He did not make a case for the bill’s policy merits, preferring instead to describe it using generic superlatives.

By bumbling the repeal of the “Affordable” Health Care Act, Republicans have somehow managed to do something President Obama could never accomplish during his presidency: make Obamacare popular!

Advertisements

Our Screwed Up Health Care System In Two Charts

March 15, 2017

Two charts show the problem with our health care system.

First, from FreedomAndProsperity.org:

And then from the Wall Street Journal:

This is the perverse outcome created by the third-party payer public programs and the tax and regulatory provisions tilted in favor of third-party payer insurance: consumers’ pocketbooks are hit more and more for health care costs despite the fact that consumers pick up less and less of the tab for total health care costs.

Obamacare reinforced this trend with its various regulations. The Republican alternative, which trades subsidies for “tax credits” and punishes consumers for not maintaining third-party coverage, further reinforces the trend. Until true free market reforms (deregulation, ending tax code distortions) are introduced, these trends will only continue.

The Republican Prescription To Health Care “Reform”: An Individual Mandate

March 11, 2017

Another aspect to the Republicans’ health care bill that’s starting to get attention: a revision of Obamacare’s reviled individual mandate. From CNBC:

The Republican plan would require anyone who has a lapse in their coverage of longer than 63 days in the prior year to pay their insurer a penalty equal to 30 percent of the premium of the individual or small group health plan they are purchasing.

The Commonwealth Fund, which produced the analysis, said there were 30 million working-age adults who reported having a gap in insurance coverage that was longer than three months.

These penalties, per CNBC, could end up being more punitive on lower income people than Obamacare’s “the higher of $695, or 2 percent of household income” penalty.

Are Republican voters having buyer’s remorse yet?

Obamacare 2.0 (Or Republican Health Care “Reform”)

March 8, 2017

For years, I’ve blogged how the third-party payment structure for routine health care is the source of problems with America’s health care system. Addressing this problem would be true reform. There are real-world examples of this in action, and the results are promising. True reform would address the regulations and tax-code distortions that favor third-party payments.

Obamacare reinforced the third-party payment structure. It continues to fail.

So what are Republicans proposing? It ain’t good:

It would repeal far less of ObamaCare than the bill Republicans sent to President Obama one year ago. The ObamaCare regulations it retains are already causing insurance markets to collapse. It would allow that collapse to continue, and even accelerate the collapse.

Michael Cannon has the gory details.

Not surprisingly, this bad legislation garners President Trump’s endorsement.